transportation

A Virtual Hard Road to Travel Workshop

A significant timber removal operation is proposed and the road agent is concerned about damage to the adjacent town road, what can the Select Board do?

How does the Select Board approve the use of our Class VI Roads by OHRV’s and Snowmobiles?

Under what circumstances can the town agree to plow or maintain a Class VI or Private Road?

INTERSECT: VHB's Innovative Platform For Developing Traffic Volumes Webinar

The COVID-19 pandemic has reshaped the priorities of today’s transportation sector. Municipalities are shuffling their programs just to keep the essential systems and services in use and maintained properly.
 

NHARPC CORNER: COVID-19 Impacts on Transportation and Mobility

Preface

The primary role of a Regional Planning Commission (RPC) is to support local municipalities in their planning and community development responsibilities. This is done in a variety of ways such as:

Intersect—Where Data and Results Converge

Collecting traffic data is a critical piece of advancing transportation projects. For municipalities and state agencies, like every other market sector, the COVID-19 pandemic forever altered how infrastructure projects move forward. In New Hampshire and throughout the east coast, VHB engineers and transportation planners recognized a need to capture accurate traffic data to help their clients during these unprecedented times.

Legal Q&A: Contracting and Competitive Bidding for Summer Road Maintenance

Now is the time of year for local governing bodies to begin implementation of the summer road maintenance program. Every municipality faces the issue each year, since RSA 231:3, I mandates "All Class V highways shall be constructed, reconstructed, and maintained by the city or town in which they are located... ." It is a very difficult program to administer, as there are many types of tasks to be performed the tasks are expensive and they often require the use of outside contractors.

Pay Attention: Traffic Work Zone Safety for Employees

Safe and efficient movement of traffic through a work zone is a primary concern for municipal public works agencies. As traffic continues to increase across New Hampshire, worker safety during road improvement projects is a top priority. The need for standardized control is especially critical when the abnormal conditions of a temporary traffic control zone make travel hazardous for the motoring public and pedestrians.

Follow the Money: New Hampshire’s Transportation Infrastructure in Decline

Whatever transportation infrastructure a municipality may own, the challenges are generally the same. A growing population and increasing demand put mounting stress on publicly maintained assets. The infrastructure that exists is aging and has not been consistently maintained. This reduces its useful life and its ability to handle the increased demands. Although the need for capital investment is clear, state and federal funding sources that municipalities have historically depended upon to finance these capital improvements are flat funded or shrinking.

A Granite State Future Depends on Working Together

In New Hampshire, every town receives technical support for making decisions about land use from one of nine Regional Planning Commissions (RPCs). The RPCs were formed by the Legislature to aid and advise municipalities and prepare a coordinated plan for the development of the region. The planning support is used by municipalities for local decisions and to address the many issues that cross municipal borders. With a new three-year, $3.37 million grant from the U.S.

What is the Mountain of Demonstrations?

Looking for new ways to improve your public works department operational efficiency? Take a trip to Gunstock Mountain on May 23, 2013 to attend the Mountain of Demonstrations, hosted by the New Hampshire Road Agents Association.

Municipal Highways and Bridges: “How Bad Is It?”

In this second article in the transportation infrastructure series (see "Follow the Money, NH Transportation Infrastructure in Decline, Jan/Feb 2013 issue), we will move beyond a description of how transportation infrastructure is funded to try to identify for local officials where they might learn more about the condition of municipal highways and bridges in our state, and their role in operating and maintaining the system. I emphasize the word "try", because one of the current realities is that there is no single or convenient location where information about these issues is compiled.

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