water infrastructure

Will New Hampshire Soon See Its First Stormwater Utility?

 

dover nh

Fifteen years after New Hampshire state law allowed towns and cities to form their own stormwater utilities, not a single municipality has successfully enacted one.

Get The Lead Out: Significant New Funding Available to Remove Lead from Drinking Water

It is well known that lead is highly toxic and harmful to people—especially to children and pregnant women—and that there are no safe levels of lead. Unfortunately, outdated and aging drinking water infrastructure in the U.S., and in New Hampshire, can be a source of lead exposure, threatening the health of children and adults who consume it.

Win with Water: Good Water Policy Requires Sound Science

Water is the source of life as we know it.  Three quarters of the Earth is covered with water, and our bodies are made of a similar percentage of this wondrous compound.  For millennia, our ancestors drank from streams, pools, springs, and puddles, often falling sick or dying from unseen contaminants.  Through trial and error, we learned which sources were safe and which were hazardous, but not until the mid-1800s, during yet another London cholera epidemic, did scientists clearly connect sanitation and waterborne disease.

Ensuring Adequate Water Supplies for the Next Century

The information contained in this article is not intended as legal advice and may no longer be accurate due to changes in the law. Consult NHMA’s legal services or your municipal attorney.


This article will help you learn some steps required to ensure a sustainable supply of clean, safe, and affordable drinking water, continuing a century-old tradition of service that water professionals are proud to provide.

WIN WITH WATER: Drinking Water Systems, Communities and New Hampshire Lead to Nation to Overcome Unprecedented Challenges and Create Opportunities

The information contained in this article is not intended as legal advice and may no longer be accurate due to changes in the law. Consult NHMA's legal services or your municipal attorney.

Funding Essential Community and Municipal Projects - USDA Rural Development

USDA Rural Development is a federal agency focused on the needs of rural communities. USDA-RD offers loans, grants and loan guarantees to help create jobs and support economic development and essential services such as housing; health care; first responder services and equipment; and water, electric and communications infrastructure. It also provides technical assistance to help cities and towns undertake community empowerment programs.

WIN WITH WATER: It’s a Dirty Job, But Someone’s Got to do it!

The information contained in this article is not intended as legal advice and may no longer be accurate due to changes in the law. Consult NHMA's legal services or your municipal attorney.

Win with Water Campaign

The information contained in this article is not intended as legal advice and may no longer be accurate due to changes in the law. Consult NHMA's legal services or your municipal attorney.

Drinking Water - A Local and Beneficial Resource

In New Hampshire, public water is a very local affair, and your involvement is a great way to enhance your personal wellbeing and community connections.  This article demonstrates public water’s local nature, and how being involved with your water system can be as refreshing as a cold drink on a hot day.

Overview of Treasury’s Final Rule and Reporting Portal Training Webinar

Treasury’s final rule for ARPA funds becomes effective on April 1st and the first report for NEU’s quickly follows on April 30th. As an “NEU,” once a year, you are required to submit Project and Expenditure reports, which includes project, obligation, and expenditure data, project demographics, subaward data, required programmatic data, and Civil Right compliance information. The first reporting deadline for NEUs is April 30, 2022, and covers the period between March 3, 2021 and March 31, 2022.

Win with Water: A Day Without Water – Why Care and What to Do?

The information contained in this article is not intended as legal advice and may no longer be accurate due to changes in the law. Consult NHMA's legal services or your municipal attorney.

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