roads

2020 Hot Topics in Road Law: A New & Improved Hard Road to Travel Virtual Workshop

NH How Does the Select Board license use and repair of a Class VI Road?

What can we do about Postal Service Vehicles causing ruts in road shoulders?

What are the rules governing CDL licensing for municipal employees?

2020 Hard Road to Travel Virtual Workshop

 How Does the Select Board grant permission for use and repair of a Class VI Road?

What can we do about Postal Service Vehicles causing ruts in road shoulders?

What are the rules governing CDL licensing for municipal employees?

2020 Hard Road to Travel Virtual Workshop

 How Does the Select Board grant permission for use and repair of a Class VI Road?

What can we do about Postal Service Vehicles causing ruts in road shoulders?

What are the rules governing CDL licensing for municipal employees?

Legal Q&A: Contracting and Competitive Bidding for Summer Road Maintenance

Now is the time of year for local governing bodies to begin implementation of the summer road maintenance program. Every municipality faces the issue each year, since RSA 231:3, I mandates "All Class V highways shall be constructed, reconstructed, and maintained by the city or town in which they are located... ." It is a very difficult program to administer, as there are many types of tasks to be performed the tasks are expensive and they often require the use of outside contractors.

Legal Q and A: Building on Private Roads under RSA 674:41: When and How is it Authorized?

It's sometimes referred to as a sort of "state zoning." In any town that has a planning board with subdivision authority, RSA 674:41 prohibits building on any lot unless "the street giving access" is a Class V highway or better; is shown on a subdivision or other plan approved by the planning board; or is a Class VI highway or "private road" upon which the board of selectmen has voted to authorize building permits under certain specified conditions.

Pay Attention: Traffic Work Zone Safety for Employees

Safe and efficient movement of traffic through a work zone is a primary concern for municipal public works agencies. As traffic continues to increase across New Hampshire, worker safety during road improvement projects is a top priority. The need for standardized control is especially critical when the abnormal conditions of a temporary traffic control zone make travel hazardous for the motoring public and pedestrians.

Demystifying Impact Fees

The development of land often creates an increased need for capital improvements such as new or improved roads and intersections, water and sewer extensions, and street lighting. New Hampshire towns and cities may charge the developer for these costs in two different ways: off-site exactions and impact fees. This article looks at what impact fees are, how they work, and what has changed over the past year.

Impact Fees v. Off-Site Exactions

Follow the Money: New Hampshire’s Transportation Infrastructure in Decline

Whatever transportation infrastructure a municipality may own, the challenges are generally the same. A growing population and increasing demand put mounting stress on publicly maintained assets. The infrastructure that exists is aging and has not been consistently maintained. This reduces its useful life and its ability to handle the increased demands. Although the need for capital investment is clear, state and federal funding sources that municipalities have historically depended upon to finance these capital improvements are flat funded or shrinking.

What is the Mountain of Demonstrations?

Looking for new ways to improve your public works department operational efficiency? Take a trip to Gunstock Mountain on May 23, 2013 to attend the Mountain of Demonstrations, hosted by the New Hampshire Road Agents Association.

Roadway Legal Hazards: Implied Dedication and Acceptance of Highways

Acceptance of a new highway can sometimes be contentious, but at least municipal officials have been able to rely on a fairly orderly procedure. A road as shown on a subdivision plan is installed by a developer and "dedicated," that is, offered, to the municipality as a public highway. The dedication is "accepted" as a Class V highway by vote of the town meeting, Polizzo v. Hampton, 126 N.H. 398 (1985), or board of selectmen, if the authority has been delegated. In cities, acceptance is by vote of the city council. Perotto v. Claremont, 101 N.H. 267 (1958).

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