environmental issues

The Role of Municipalities in Preventing Childhood Lead Exposures

It is well known that lead is highly toxic and harmful to people, especially children. Unfortunately, because of its aging housing stock, New Hampshire is experiencing childhood lead poisoning at a rate nearly twice the national average. Among the several hundred documented cases of lead poisoning each year in the Granite State, it is estimated that a significant number of children are poisoned as a result of unsafe renovation, repair, or painting activities. While the U.S.

Are You Aware of the Low-Income Drought Assistance Program

Are you aware of the Low-Income Drought Assistance Program (DAP) created by the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) to assist eligible low-income homeowners with their need for an immediate reliable water supply and to improve the resiliency of their drinking water against future threats of drought? The program provides financial assistance to meet these residents’ essential needs, keep them in their homes and reduce stress on local financial aid programs.

Keene’s Path to Community Power in New Hampshire

Community Power, also known as municipal electricity aggregation, is an emerging opportunity for New Hampshire cities and towns to negotiate lower electricity rates and cleaner energy on behalf of their communities. Community Power offers an alternative to the utility default supply service, and is frequently undertaken to reduce electricity costs, offer a stable rate, provide a responsible alternative to third party supply options, and increase renewable energy in the electricity supply.

2020 Land Use Law Conference

Full day virtual conference for municipal land use officials including members of planning and zoning boards, planners, land use administrators, select boards, town and city councilors, building inspectors, code enforcement officers and public works personnel. Presentations will focus on the legal authority and procedures these land use boards must understand with content structured to be beneficial to both novice and experienced municipal officials.

New Hampshire’s Water Assets Under Pressure: Municipal Wastewater Systems

This is the third of a four-part series focusing on the State’s water infrastructure: public drinking water, wastewater, storm water and dams. Each article will spotlight a municipal system; address critical needs of that infrastructure system; and outline funding sources available to municipalities today that may be used to maintain and sustain these critically important infrastructure systems.

New Hampshire’s Water Assets Under Pressure: Public Drinking Water Systems

This is the first of a four-part series focusing on the State's water infrastructure: public drinking water, wastewater, storm water and dams. Each article will spotlight a municipal system; address critical needs of that infrastructure system; and outline funding sources available to municipalities today that may be used to maintain and sustain these critically important infrastructure systems.

Department of Environmental Services Marks 25th Anniversary

On January 2, 1987, a notable event occurred in the state of New Hampshire’s efforts to protect its environment. Culminating years of legislative deliberations, a new environmental agency was created: the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (DES). So this year, 2012, marks the 25thanniversary of the creation of DES and its service to the people of our state.

Drought Preparedness and Response in New Hampshire: What Can Municipalities Do?

The lack of snow and the unseasonably warm New Hampshire winter have many people across the state thinking about the potential for drought this spring or summer. Because drought is progressive in nature and comes on slowly, it is often not recognized until it reaches a severe level. New Hampshire experienced a limited drought in the summer of 2010 and the third worst drought on record from 2001-2003.

New Hampshire’s Water Assets Under Pressure: Municipal Stormwater Systems

This is the second of a four-part series focusing on the state’s water infrastructure: public drinking water, wastewater, storm water and dams. Each article will spotlight a municipal system; address critical needs of that infrastructure system; and outline funding sources available to municipalities today that may be used to maintain and sustain these critically important infrastructure systems.

Municipalities: Stewards of New Hampshire’s Water Infrastructure

While much of the water infrastructure is "out of sight," it can't be "out of mind," as New Hampshire's environment and economy depend too much on it.

New Hampshire residents are dependent on an array of infrastructure that moves, stores and treats water. To make this happen, cities and towns own and operate a lot of water infrastructure in New Hampshire. These municipal systems provide public drinking water, centralized wastewater, storm water and dam infrastructure.

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