public works

Legal Q&A: Contracting and Competitive Bidding for Summer Road Maintenance

Now is the time of year for local governing bodies to begin implementation of the summer road maintenance program. Every municipality faces the issue each year, since RSA 231:3, I mandates "All Class V highways shall be constructed, reconstructed, and maintained by the city or town in which they are located... ." It is a very difficult program to administer, as there are many types of tasks to be performed the tasks are expensive and they often require the use of outside contractors.

New Hampshire’s Water Assets Under Pressure: Municipal Dams

This is the fourth of a four-part series focusing on the State’s water infrastructure: public drinking water, wastewater, storm water and dams. Each article has spotlighted a municipal system; addressed critical needs of that infrastructure system; and outlined funding sources available to municipalities today that may be used to maintain and sustain these critically important infrastructure systems.

New Hampshire’s Water Assets Under Pressure: Municipal Wastewater Systems

This is the third of a four-part series focusing on the State’s water infrastructure: public drinking water, wastewater, storm water and dams. Each article will spotlight a municipal system; address critical needs of that infrastructure system; and outline funding sources available to municipalities today that may be used to maintain and sustain these critically important infrastructure systems.

Pay Attention: Traffic Work Zone Safety for Employees

Safe and efficient movement of traffic through a work zone is a primary concern for municipal public works agencies. As traffic continues to increase across New Hampshire, worker safety during road improvement projects is a top priority. The need for standardized control is especially critical when the abnormal conditions of a temporary traffic control zone make travel hazardous for the motoring public and pedestrians.

Demystifying Impact Fees

The development of land often creates an increased need for capital improvements such as new or improved roads and intersections, water and sewer extensions, and street lighting. New Hampshire towns and cities may charge the developer for these costs in two different ways: off-site exactions and impact fees. This article looks at what impact fees are, how they work, and what has changed over the past year.

Impact Fees v. Off-Site Exactions

Public Sidewalks and Municipal Program Responsibilities

Sidewalks are part of the public highway, but they present local officials with problems that differ from those seen in the area reserved for automobile traffic. As you consider whether your municipality should have a policy to encourage construction and maintenance of sidewalks, there are several stakeholders whom you should consult. The level of disagreement as to where and how sidewalks should be constructed or maintained may surprise you. Unfortunately, there are no easy answers to these questions. Let’s describe several of the differing perspectives.

What is the Mountain of Demonstrations?

Looking for new ways to improve your public works department operational efficiency? Take a trip to Gunstock Mountain on May 23, 2013 to attend the Mountain of Demonstrations, hosted by the New Hampshire Road Agents Association.

New Hampshire’s Water Assets Under Pressure: Public Drinking Water Systems

This is the first of a four-part series focusing on the State's water infrastructure: public drinking water, wastewater, storm water and dams. Each article will spotlight a municipal system; address critical needs of that infrastructure system; and outline funding sources available to municipalities today that may be used to maintain and sustain these critically important infrastructure systems.

New Hampshire’s Water Assets Under Pressure: Municipal Stormwater Systems

This is the second of a four-part series focusing on the state’s water infrastructure: public drinking water, wastewater, storm water and dams. Each article will spotlight a municipal system; address critical needs of that infrastructure system; and outline funding sources available to municipalities today that may be used to maintain and sustain these critically important infrastructure systems.

Dover Wastewater Treatment Facility Generates Green Energy

Treated effluent is more than water in a pipeline; it’s a potential source of clean renewable energy. While conventional-design hydro turbine generators have been considered for years as a means to scavenge and harvest this potential power source, the challenge posed by the fluctuating flow environment and has more often than not rendered this technology impractical and not cost effective.

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